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This is a photo record of the progress on my - to be - new abode, currently under construction

The highlight of this period of 3 months during the winter wet of 2013 was the working bees with Torsten and Michael putting up the verandah posts and beam and a second one later installing the verandah rafter battens.

A difficult part of this work was the installation of the hip rafters – the angled rafters spanning between the corners of the house and the corners of the veranda and the jack rafters – the rafters between the verandah beam and the hip rafter – and then extending the verandah battens to meet up with them. The hip rafters were incredibly heavy and lifting them into place was no easy job, even with two of us. The ends of the rafters had to be accurately cut to afford a flush surface for fastening the fascia board or to fit against the side of the house, all very tricky. (I took heaps of photos of all of that but they all seem to have disappeared into the void).

 

It was during this period that I developed my intense dislike for rough sawn hardwood – because of its weight, appearance, its rough surface (very painful splinters, particularly under the nails - with some jobs it is not possible to wear gloves) and its tendency to warp in shape over time, the joists being the main culprit. On the other hand the dressed hardwoods used for the verandah posts and balustrade (kwila) and the verandah decking (palawan/northern box imported from Indonesia) are beautiful. Still heavy and hard, but, apart from that, a pleasure to work with. So, getting the frame ready for the roofer took an age. It all involved working with nasty timber off the end of a ladder or work platform in wet and cold conditions.

In retrospect, all that would have been better done by a (good) tradie who had done it many times before. The installation, sudsequently, of the roofing iron was a much more straightforward and safe task, and it would have been more sense to have done that part ourselves, because you’re mostly standing on the battens over the iron you’ve just laid. And in our case, with a roof pitch of only 15° (it doesn't need to be steep enough up here to let the snow slide off) there is virtually no chance of slipping off the roof, and, even if you did you’d end up on the verandah roof (which is laid first). The verandah roof pitches are about 7 to 9°. You live and learn.

Anyway, eventually we got all that done, and we were able to start on the cladding of the roof and the walls

from 25th June 2013
to 25 Sept 2013

Mar-13

Apr-13

May-13

Jun-13

Jul-13

Aug-13

Sep-13

Oct-13

Nov-13

Dec-13

Jan-14

Feb-14

Mar-14

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May-14

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